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Thread: Parallel Parlor Construction Plans

  1. #1
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    Default Parallel Parlor Construction Plans

    I'm making preperations for building a new parlor here real soon.Looking into a swing 8 or 10 parallel parlor. Does any one know where to find deminsions or building plans for this type of parlor?I was going to try to utilize an existing building if it will fit.Thanks

  2. #2
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    By parallel parlour do you mean one where the cows stand one infront of the other in a line - head to tail??? I get confused because you guys name things differently to us sometimes!

    If you would consider herringbone plans i.e. where the cows stand like / / / / / /
    then you could contact any NZ dairy shed building company and they would have standard plans they may be able to give you.

    This site has some pretty typical NZ herringbone parlours. Hope this helps

  3. #3
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    I'm talking about an elavated parlor with cows side by side and you milk between the back legs...

  4. #4
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    http://www.delaval.com/Products/Milk...bout_DeLavalAb


    http://www.delaval.com/Products/Milk...bout_DeLavalAb

    Not sure if these are any help but I'm sure a dealer would LOVE to talk to you.

  5. #5
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    Oh thanks for the explanation. I've milked in parlours like those, the cow-flow is awful compared to herringbones. You can still milk through the back legs in herringbones, most people do in NZ. I prefer side cupping though.

  6. #6
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    http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/parlor
    This is actually a presentation showing the building and plans used to remodel a parlor with the finished product shown as well and
    http://www.extension.iastate.edu/dub...blications.htm
    if you scroll down under the Trans Iowa Parlor heading of this second link it shows links to blueprints as well as videos of loading, milking, and other advantages of these parlors.

  7. #7
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    I guess I didn't know for sure but I'm guessing this is the same type of parlor you were talking about.

  8. #8
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    The herringbone that MBurgess is talking about would actually be called a parabone here in the US. The herringbone is angled much more than the parabone and you milk to the side of the legs not through the legs like the parabone. I would agree that cow flow is much slower with a parallel but a rapid exit (neck rail swings up and all can walk out in seconds, more$) can make the parallel the quickest exit of all parlors. I've heard stories about teaching new cows to enter a parallel.

    We built a Surge swing 8 parlor last year. Their package had the parabone angle and we go between the legs. We are milking 100 cows 3x right now and one person can fetch the 2 groups of cows, milk them and finish cleaning up in just over 2 hours. We were running 50,000 SCC but have jumped up to 100,000. You may be able to find plans from Surge.
    Our parlor demensions are:
    Width without exit lane (nose to nose): 19ft
    Length including steps without exit lane or walkway: 31ft
    Height (estimate) 8ft

    You would have to add your exit lanes. Either they exit the parlor on both sides or you need an alley in the front to exit out one side. Plus you need a walkway for workers in the front.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the clarification bmvf. We just call them all herringbones and differentiate by the distance between the center of each cow (or the center of each zig-zag in other words). The parabone versions are commonly 660mm and the herringbone versions are about 800mm.

    The rapid exit in a parallel will never make up for the fast entry in a herringbone or parabone. And if you are a good milker you can time things so that you can open the front gate and start letting the row exit while you still have roughly 25% of the cups to change over (in a swing parlour). This way by the time you change the last set of cups that last cow will just start moving away and the new row coming in behind her.

    I would imagine a herringbone/parabone would be a bit cheaper to build too.

  10. #10
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    Not sure what would make a herringbone so much faster than a parallel with rapid exit. I've milked in both and would never in a million years go back to a herringbone.

    We do about 100 cows an hour in hour double 10 parallel.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MBurgess View Post
    The rapid exit in a parallel will never make up for the fast entry in a herringbone or parabone. And if you are a good milker you can time things so that you can open the front gate and start letting the row exit while you still have roughly 25% of the cups to change over (in a swing parlour). This way by the time you change the last set of cups that last cow will just start moving away and the new row coming in behind her.

    I would imagine a herringbone/parabone would be a bit cheaper to build too.
    Your way of unloading and reloading the parlor is exactly what we do. Time is wasted when you stand around waiting for cows to leave and enter. From my price calculations in 2008 it is cheaper for the slanted parlors. The biggest factor was the space needed for rapid exit.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElJefe View Post
    Not sure what would make a herringbone so much faster than a parallel with rapid exit. I've milked in both and would never in a million years go back to a herringbone.

    We do about 100 cows an hour in hour double 10 parallel.
    I could milk at least 90 cows an hour in a swing 10 herringbone, so I would expect a lot more in a double 10.

    If you saw our cow flow you would believe me. Maybe I should take a video if I can work out how to get it online!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MBurgess View Post
    I could milk at least 90 cows an hour in a swing 10 herringbone, so I would expect a lot more in a double 10.

    If you saw our cow flow you would believe me. Maybe I should take a video if I can work out how to get it online!

    If I recall correctly, you also don't prep your cows correct? We could also push plenty of cows through without prepping them.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MBurgess View Post
    I could milk at least 90 cows an hour in a swing 10 herringbone, so I would expect a lot more in a double 10.
    From my research, A swing 10 would be as fast as a double 8.

    I also agree with Eljefe that not prepping would speed things up. Also, less milk per cow would make things go faster and the NZ index of milking speed tells me that you and your countymen (and women) try to fix slow milking cows. Plus I think your cows are in better walking condition than ours due to more grazing.

  15. #15
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    Yes those are all valid points.

  16. #16
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    Thanks tjkillduff , that video is exactly what I was looking for. I can learn what I was wanting to know from it.Thanks again

  17. #17
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    A few things I noticed from watching those videos . . .

    - Swing arms are a luxury. If you are looking to cut costs, they really aren't necessary, especially if you will be making your pit as wide as the one in the video! Most swing parlours in NZ don't have them. We milked in a brand new parlour last year that had them and I can't say I found them that much better. As long as your milk tubes are the correct length and placed correctly for good alignment, the alignment advantages from the swing arms would be minimal.

    - I would recommend having a zig-zag bum rail instead of a straight one, so they cows are always in the right position, which also helps with cup alignment.

    - That manure hand scraper thing is a joke - it is very dangerous (think of doing that around fresh heifers!) and slow. I am used to having high pressure hoses in the pit and out in the yards, and we spray down every row if necessary, but usually only a few times a milking. Their final cleaning method is a joke too.

    - That pit is too deep in my opinion. If you are milking 100+ cows you will start to get sore arms. Your elbow to wrist should be relatively parallel with the floor.

    - If you want good cow flow, the cows should be able to exit without making any turns straight away. You can get away with these 90 degree turns at the exit if you have a very small parlour and aren't too concerned about milking times. But anything larger than a 10 aside would benefit by looking into this.

  18. #18
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    I am considering purchasing a parallel walk through parlor where they milk 24 on one side. I would like to take this 24 per side parrallel and cut it in half to make a 12 per side parabone. I'm thinking that to do this I would just need to put the end gate at a 70 degree angle and move the neck rail in closer. The parlor has a zig-zagged rump rail. If this is a parrallel rump rail will it still work for parabone, or will it bee too close together. Any ideas on the feasibility of this idea would be appreciated?

  19. #19

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    I think you should look in for the better ways to carry out construction as that might help you to get a better hold on the construction industry. There are many online construction plan providers who may help you to plan and work accordingly.

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